March 22, 2020 – Wolfe’s Neck Wood State Park – Maine

Today Shadow, Wilma and I Adventured to Wolfe’s Neck Wood State Park in Freeport, Maine.  Wolfe’s Neck Wood State Park is an approximately 250 acre state park on a peninsula between the Casco Bay and the Harraseeket River.  It contains various ecosystems, and is known for the local ospreys who nest on Googins Island.  Wolfe’s Neck Wood State Park is open year around, and has an entrance fee.  As expected the park is popular for:  bird watching, walking, educational programs, and picnicking.

We had a spectacular Adventure to Wolfe’s Neck Wood State Park on a sunny winter day.  I had read about this Park for some time and finally decided to make the trip.  So off we headed with high expectations.  I had researched the trails and printed a map so had a general idea of a plan, as I wanted to make sure we explored both the River and Bay sides of this peninsula Park.

We began our hike at the Harraseeket Trail, a 1.8 mile trail that begins at the parking lot.  I was quite excited to begin our hike.  The pathway was very clear, although I did not notice markers along the path, only when the trail intersected others.  The colors were dull, and the air crisp.  The more we walked the more inspired I became, finding various bridges, and soon spotting the bright blue River.  We stopped to gaze out, the River quiet expanse.  The trail was high above the River and pareled it for some time before veering away.  The trail had some hills, lots of roots, rocks, and of course lovely River views.  We almost had this Trail to ourselves, a peaceful oasis in the great outdoors.

After completing the Harraseeket Trail the Trail merged into the Casco Bay Trail, what I soon would learn to be quite popular.  Just immediate to this merging we found the rocky shores of the Casco Bay, just gorgeous.  There were wooden stairways and stone stairways at various locations leading to the water’s edge.  We enjoyed relaxing on the rocks, Shadow enjoying the water, while Wilma balanced eloquently on the unusually shaped rocks, some formed in circular formation.  The view of the Bay was beautiful.  The farther we walked the more people we saw, but there still was enough space to find your own spot, in almost all areas.  There were kiosks along this trail, and seating, even located across the Osprey nesting Island.  The water was quite clear, and varied in tones, sometimes appearing aqua, and tropic.

The Casco Bay Trail soon led to the White Pines Trail, continuing the scenery as we had seen on the Casco Bay Trail.  I believe it was on the White Pines Trail that we found a sandy beach to relax for a few, Wilma enjoying a quick dig, while Shadow wading in the water and dreaming of a longer leash.  From there we then turned onto the North Trail, which looped around before returning to the end of the Casco Bay Trail.  The North Trail was somewhat dull but had one look-out over the Casco Bay.  I actually heard another visitor describing the North Trail as perfect for snow shoeing but overall a “boring” Trail.

We spent about two and a half hours exploring this magnificent park, mainly on the above trails, however, traversing parts of others along our walk.  The farther we hiked the more impressed I became.  The scenery was beautiful and diverse.  In addition it was so nice to see the dogs almost all on leash, and owners being respectful of one another.  We had a special day that I will always treasure.  Wolfe’s Neck Park did not disappoint, and we definitely will be back again (Rating:  4.5).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “March 22, 2020 – Wolfe’s Neck Wood State Park – Maine

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