Throwback Adventure – Andres Institute of Art – New Hampshire

I will have sections of my blog that I will title “Throwback Adventure”, and will plan on posting them every Thursday. These are journeys we have taken before I started the blog, but are well worth sharing. Many of these Throwback Adventures will include our Buster, who was known for his crazy tail, his happy howl, and his zest for life. We miss him dearly…he is forever in our hearts!

In June 2015 Shadow, Buster, and I Adventured to the Andres Institute of Art in Brookline, New Hampshire.  The Andres Institute of Art is reported to be New England’s largest sculpture park.  It was founded in 1996 by supporter Paul Andres and sculptor John Weidman.  The Park is a public park and is free of charge, although donations are appreciated.

We had a unique Adventure to the Andres Institute of Art, one of our first sculpture park adventures.  We enjoyed hiking in the woods, the terrain a little overgrown, and uneven.  I remember finding some sculptures, but also thinking there were few available for viewing.  However, in reading more about it to create this blog I would guess if I had located a map beforehand my thoughts may have been different.  However, we enjoyed a warm walk, searching for the sculptures between the trees, and photographing those we located.  I should have been more prepared, but still glad we could visit this distinctive New England Park (Throwback blogs will not always be rated).

 

January 5, 2019 – Northern Rail Trail – New Hampshire

Today Shadow, Wilma, and I Adventured to the Northern Rail Trail in Lebanon, New Hampshire.  The Northern Rail Trail is a 58 mile multi-use trail popular for dog walking, running, skiing, biking, and snowmobiling.  It runs from Lebanon to Boscawen and is the longest Rail Trail in New Hampshire

We had a simple Adventure to the Northern Rail Trail.  I planned this stop to break up our trip which involved various Adventures throughout Vermont.  I was quite curious to explore this Trail as I had read that it often parallels the river and has bridges along the route.  There was a brief jaunt where we were able to see the River, which I believe was the Connecticut River.  We were able too locate a little trail that went directly to the River’s edge although too far above the River for Shadow and Wilma to drink or swim.  (The video below is from the River as we walked back to the Trail).

Throughout our walk I was glad to see that the trail was not just behind backyards, but also traversed the woods, paralleled the river, and went through field-type landscape.  I was disappointed to only spot one bridge, concrete, and dull, but yet had realized we might not see any bridges due to the sheer length of the Trail.

Along our walk we saw many dog walkers, and were quite glad to not run into any snowmobiles.  So overall I would say this was typical to my other visits to Rail Trails, a simple, and long walk with no memorable landmarks.  However, likely a much different experience for those on a bicycle.  Nevertheless still glad we could walk on the Northern Rail Trail today (Rating:  3).

 

 

December 7, 2019 – Sawyer’s Crossing Covered Bridge/Cresson Bridge – New Hampshire

Yesterday Shadow, Wilma, and I Adventured to the Sawyer’s Crossing Covered Bridge, also known as the Cresson Bridge.  The Sawyer’s Crossing Covered Bridge is located in Swanzey, New Hampshire and crosses the Ashuelot River.  It was originally built in 1771, and later rebuilt in 1859.  It is one of the bridges located on the Ashuelot Rail Trail.

We had a deja-vu type of Adventure to the Sawyer’s Crossing Covered Bridge.  In researching several covered bridges I had noted that there were several in Swanzey, all bright red in color.  The Sawyer’s Crossing Covered bridge was one of the two I chose to explore.  We arrived, again pleased to see the parking lot was plowed, the location covered with fresh snow.  We dove over the plowed bank, and wandered over to the bridge to snap some photographs, and yes some more practice for our Christmas card.  The River was still at this location, and the bridge smooth, versus the lattice style of the Denman Thompson Bridge.  We walked along the shore, again cautious to get too close and end up over the snow covered edge.  The bridge was located in a quiet residential area, and was quite scenic.  We walked up to the sign near the front of the bridge, but traffic was observed to be too dangerous to attempt a walk through the bridge.  There were some snow covered picnic benches nearby.  It was a short but pleasant visit to the Sawyer’s Covered Bridge.  I recall few snow covered Adventures to covered bridges, and our Adventures to these two lovely bridges definitely did not disappoint (Rating:  4).

 

December 7, 2019 – Denman Thompson/West Swanzey Bridge – New Hampshire

Today Shadow, Wilma, and I Adventured to the Denman Thompson/West Swanzey Bridge in Swanzey, New Hampshire.  The Denman Thompson Covered Bridge was built in 1832 and crosses the Ashuelot River.  The Bridge permits one-vehicle travel, and has a walkway on one side.  There is a small park and picnic area adjacent to the Bridge.

We had a snow-filled Adventure to the Denman Thompson Covered Bridge.  I was excited to visit a new covered bridge, the weekend after our first snow storm.  I was pleased to see the parking area was plowed so we could safely leave our car and explore.  We immediately heading to the Bridge.  The snow was deep, adding an interesting aspect to our exploring. The scene was beautiful, the snow covered the park and bridge, while the River water flowed steadily.  The Bridge was adorned with Christmas lights, and a wreath to celebrate the season.  I was cautious to not get too close to the edge of the Park, unclear where the slope began and the water started.  We posed for a bit and enjoyed the Winter wonderland.

After exploring the side of the Bridge we sauntered up to the sidewalk, and strolled under and through the Bridge.  I appreciate finding a bridge that contains a walkway, providing safe travel under.  There was a lovely view from the Bridge down the River.  The location was peaceful and had little traffic.  After observing the sites we made our way back to the River’s edge to snap a few more photographs.  As you can see below we are practicing for our annual Christmas card, although I did save some of my favorites for a future post.  Definitely a gorgeous New England Bridge (Rating:  4).

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Weekly Video/Photo

If you regularly follow my blog, and the weekly/video photo I would recommend skipping on to paragraph three, specific to this week’s video/photo.  I have decided to add a weekly video/photo section to my blog.  This blog will display a video or photo, usually highlighting an Adventure, while I might also sneak in some that are humorous, adorable, or just other fun dog moments.

So if you have followed my blog from the beginning you will know that I adopted Shadow as a puppy, and about a year later adopted Buster as a puppy.  We had many wonderful years together before experiencing the devastating loss of Buster at just seven.  It took a long time for our hearts to heal, but almost a year later we welcomed little Wilma into our world.

Today’s feature is a video from Campton Falls, also known as Beebe Falls in Campton, New Hampshire.  Shadow, Wilma, and I Adventured to this falls back in July of 2018.  It was a gorgeous, singing Falls, surrounded with spectacular colored rocks.  It was a little challenging venturing to the bottom of the Falls, but we managed to get there.  Such a lovely Falls!  You can read more by typing in Campton/Beede Falls in the search box, but please enjoy this video as a summary of this picturesque Adventure.

 

 

October 19, 2019 – Saint-Gaudens National Historic Park – New Hampshire

This past weekend we had a getaway to Vermont, which involved many Adventures, most of which I will blog about.  We stayed in a cabin in the woods, and due to no wifi I am far behind on my blog, therefore posting much later then preferred.  However, definitely some amazing locations that I am excited to share.

One of our Adventures on the way was the the Saint-Gaudens National Historic Park in Cornish, New Hampshire.  This is the second time we have been to this location as Shadow, Buster, and I Adventured to this Park back in October of 2015. We were thrilled on our recent visit to have My Parents join us!  The Saint-Gaudens National Historic Park is the former home, gardens, and studios of sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens. Much of his artwork is displayed in the gallery and on the grounds. The Site also includes: nature trails, tours, various statues, and gardens.  The Park also sponsors summer concerts, and workshops.

We had a gorgeous Adventure to the Saint-Gaudens National Historic Park.  Although I had blogged about it in one of my Thursday throwback segments, I could not resist writing about it again.  Shadow, Wilma, and I arrived about an hour previous to meeting My Parents so we could explore the trails, before returning to tour the main grounds.  I was quite pleased to quickly locate the Ravine Trail, which contained a waterfall we had discovered on our past visit.  The trail was packed with colorful leaves, and sloped quickly into the ravine before turning and following the brook, scattered with fall foliage.  It was a crisp Fall day, but just perfect for an energetic hike.  The trail was not too clear, but I followed it by memory, and also spotted several informational displays, and a bridge on the path.  I was quite thrilled to find the waterfall again, simple, but lovely.  We continued through the trail before hiking up the ravine, and ending in the field on the opposite side of the property.

After traversing the Ravine Trail we wandered around the property checking on the buildings, statues, gardens, and spectacular mountain views.  I tried not to miss a detail snapping numerous photographs throughout.  It was not long after then that My Parents arrived.  Having been there previously, and in refreshing my memory of the site before their arrival, I was pleased to provide an informal tour.  We wandered around viewing the various features throughout.  Shadow engaged in continual enthusiastic rolls, causing me to ponder, did he know he was on vacation?!  Wilma was a bit overzealous, but how could you blame her having her Grandparents in tow!  We picnicked with a view, enjoyed the wonderful company, and created memories.   I really do love the Saint-Gaudens National Historic Park, and can just imagine the indoor exhibits are quite fantastic as well.  So glad we were able to spend a family afternoon at this beautiful Park, definitely a special National Park in New England (Rating:  4.5).

Please see below for photographs from both of our Adventures.  You can also read about our first Adventure by typing in “Saint-Gaudens” in the “search box” (to the right side of the page on a computer and on the bottom of the page on a phone)

October 2019

 

October 2015

October 19, 2019 – Cornish-Windsor Bridge – New Hampshire

This past weekend we had a getaway to Vermont, which involved many Adventures, most of which I will blog about.  We stayed in a cabin in the woods, and due to no wifi I am far behind on my blog, therefore posting much later then preferred.  However, definitely some amazing locations that I am excited to share.

One of our Adventures on the way was the Cornish-Windsor Bridge in Cornish, New Hampshire.  The Bridge was built in 1866, and is one of the longest in the country.  It crosses the Connecticut River, connecting New Hampshire and Vermont.

This was the second time that we had Adventured to the Cornish-Windsor bridge as Shadow, Buster, and I visited back in October 2015.  Surprisingly it appears that I did not photograph the pups at our initial visit.  On this trip we were thrilled that My parents were joining us!  Our Adventure to the Cornish-Windsor bridge was incredibly panoramic.  We located two spots to view this spectacular bridge, one of which was close-up and well trafficked, the second more distant, and dog friendly.  The Cornish-Windsor bridge was quite stunning, grey in color, beautiful in style, and magnificent in length.  We captured the bridge from both locations, and enjoyed the scenery.   So glad we could view the Cornish-Windsor bridge again today (Rating 4.5).

 

October 2019

October 2015