May 23, 2020 – Chesterfield Gorge Nature Area – New Hampshire

Today Wilma and I Adventured to the Chesterfield Gorge Nature Area in Chesterfield, New Hampshire, also referred to as the Chesterfield Gorge State Wayside.  This Area is a small state park at just 13 acres that features the Wilde Brook, a trail, and a rocky gorge with waterfalls.  There are picnic tables and a visitor center that is open in season.

We had a water-rushing Adventure to the Chesterfield Gorge Nature Area.  This was the second time I had been there as Shadow, Buster, and I visited almost five years ago.   Due to this visit being so long ago I decided to blog about this Nature Area again today.  We began down the trail and took every opportunity to go down to the water’s edge.  Wilma was quite pleased to find many rocks, and has continued to be more comfortable with the water, eager to wade and drink.  We took our time finding all the little spots along the way, often veering off on the side trails.

Throughout the Trail we found three bridges, of different lengths, adding some character to the Nature Area.  Overall landscape was very brown, however the rushing water brightened the location through sound.  The highlight, as you may expect, was the water running through the Chesterfield Gorge creating a cascade waterfall.  The main viewing area was blocked by some tacky fencing to add to safety of visitors.  There were numerous drops of cascades, creating a tall cascade.  It was simple compared to our recent waterfall Adventures, but yet still pretty.  It appeared as someone had carved some benches out of trees, adding a sitting area in this spot.

So although I would describe the Chesterfield Gorge Nature Area as far from spectacular we still enjoyed our visit.  Amazingly we spent about an hour and a half walking on the trail, relaxing near the water, exploring, and taking photographs.  We did not see many people but did meet a group of people that Wilma was quite thrilled about, even running circles around me.  It was just so funny to see, like they were long last friends.  If you live locally or are in the area I would definitely recommend a visit to the Chesterfield Gorge Nature Area (Rating:  4).

October 2015

May 16, 2020 – Welton Falls – New Hampshire

Yesterday Wilma and I Adventured to Welton Falls in Alexandria, New Hampshire.  Welton Falls is located in Welton Falls State Forest.  It can be found after an almost three mile round trip hike.  Welton Falls is in the middle of a gorge, and is approximately 30 feet in height.  It is sourced from the Fowler River.

We had a wonderful Adventure to Welton Falls.  We parked at the AMC Lodge and located a brown sign to the right for the Falls.  We followed the trail in and soon merged onto the Manning Trail, a yellow blaze.  The trail weaves through the woods and crossed the lower trail.  It did not take long for us to hear the music of the Fowler River.  We were parallel to the River high above until soon descending and becoming closer and closer to the River.  The River was just beautiful, full of power.  Much of the trail was muddy and water filled, covered with rocks and roots.  We did not find it challenging but were careful to watch our step.

It did not take us long to arrive at the part of the trail that crosses the River.  I thought this may be challenging but I soon realized it was much more complicated then I thought.  I tried to encourage Wilma in, and although she followed she had no interest in getting too deep.  My mind raced pondering a solution.  We soon began following the Rivers edge, sometimes bushwalking through to find that perfect spot.  The water was high and rushing creating a current and minimal exposed rocks to cross all the way.  We did manage to cross over where the River split but could not find a way over the other side.  This was very frustrating and discouraging.  I felt disappointed in myself being so annoyed, so decided to find a rock to relax and appreciate the gorgeous River.

After taking a little rest we continued on and eventually found a spot to cross, a combination of a log and rocks.  I was quite grateful that my balance skills appeared intact and of course lucky that  Wilma is always quick on her feet!  We finally made it!!

We continued on the Manning Trail on the other side of the River.  It did not take long before we arrived at the top of the Falls and then headed down to the gorge.  I worked hard to get photos but the Falls was challenging to capture and the footing was slippery and sometimes dangerous.  The Falls was immense with rushing water through the gorge.  It twisted through the rocks before ending in a pool, then continued down the gorge.  Welton Falls was beautiful and well worth the effort!!

In addition to viewing the waterfall we loved the gorge.  There was not a sole around as if we had a canyon of our own. Wilma enjoyed some chaotic digging, stick chewing and of course rock jumping.  Our  peaceful oasis!  Eventually I decided it was time to head back.

We we’re lucky to find the same place to cross and blessed again with good balance!  I was surprised to find myself quite tired, but the trail back ascended continually.  In addition to my labor bushwalking I actually slipped and fell numerous times, adding too my exhaustion.  However all put together the features of a true and rewarding hike.  We spent over four hours hiking and enjoying the waterfall.  So glad we were determined to complete our Adventure.  Welton Falls was absolutely spectacular, a waterfall I would definitely recommend (Rating:  Trail – 4, Falls 5).

 

May 2, 2020 – Waterloo Covered Bridge – New Hampshire

The Waterloo Covered Bridge is in Warner, New Hampshire. The Waterloo Covered Bridge was built in 1840, but was later replaced. The Bridge crosses the Warner River.

We had a river-filled Adventure to the Waterloo Covered Bridge.  I was pleased to find the bridge in a quiet location.  The Bridge was especially scenic from scenic side-view, yet simple from the end.  We found a trail next to the bridge, appearing to run between two rivers.  Conveniently a local was walking through noting the trail to be a lovely trail that commenced at another road.  We decided to explore this unexpected path.  The trail was still brown from winter, but yet unique and provided several opportunities to get to the water’s edge.  This was a nice little surprise on our Adventure to the Waterloo Covered Bridge.

After returning to the bridge we crossed through and over to the opposite side.  It has been some time since we have been able to wander through a bridge, due to the often busy and dangerous trek.  On this occasion we were able to peer out the openings down the river and snap a couple photos.  The opposite side had a small grassy area, and a rushing cascade (suspected to be Waterloo Falls), generating a lovely scene.  Wilma glanced down the cascades, and again appeared curious by the water, so fun to observe.  The Waterloo Covered Bridge was peaceful, and just right.  Definitely a special covered bridge in New Hampshire (Rating:  4).

 

Throwback Adventure – Lonesome Lake – July 2017

In remembering our Shadow I decided to re-post some of our favorite Adventures on our “Throwback Adventure” Thursdays.  Shadow had amazing solo Adventures, Adventures with Buster, and Adventures with Wilma.  He was one lucky boy!  The post today was our Adventure to Lonesome Lake, probably my favorite solo Adventure with Shadow.  The hike was challenging, and arriving at the Lake was spectacular.  I remember being so impressed how I could not keep up with my nine-year-old Shadow.  We enjoyed walking around the Lake and appreciating the spectacular scenery.  Upon completing this journey Shadow celebrated with a happy roll.  Forever precious memories!  Please see below for my original post and photographs (three photographs have been added on this re-posted blog):

I will have sections of my blog that I will title “Throwback Adventure”, and will plan on posting them every Thursday.  These are journeys we have taken before I started the blog, but are well worth sharing.

In July 2017 me and Shadow journeyed to Lonesome Lake in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.  (Wilma had not yet joined our world).  Lonesome Lake had been on my “must explore” adventure list, and we found a perfect day to venture on this hike.  Lonesome Lake is a body of water that is located in Franconia Notch in the White Mountains, just south of Cannon Mountain.  You can only reach this Lake by a hike, which creates a magical journey.  There was some reconstruction on the trail, so we were directed toward an alternative route.  The trail was a tough trail for me, but it seemed to be quite effortless for Shadow.  He was nine at the time (now ten) and did not miss a beat.  Upon arrival we hiked around the Lake, and Shadow enjoyed cooling down with numerous dips in the Lake.  It was very crowded at the Lake, but yet there was little traffic on the trail around the lake.  There was an AMC hut located at the Lake which provided snacks, bathroom breaks, and even lodging.  This hut was not dog friendly, but we were able to wander around and check out the area.  Heading back from the Lake, was of course a breeze.  My only disappointment in this hike was I imagined a more accessible beachfront where you could relax and enjoy sitting by the Lake.  However, it was very crowded, no sandy shores, and hard to find little outlets to the Lake.  Luckily this was not a barrier for Shadow who was able to sneak in many swims.  I absolutely love a hike that leads to a landmark that cannot be reached otherwise.  Definitely a memorable day of hiking, and adventures.  (Rating:  5)

 

 

Relaxing and Rolling after an amazing day:

Throwback Adventure – Mt. Orne Covered Bridge – New Hampshire

I will have sections of my blog that I will title “Throwback Adventure”, and will plan on posting them every Thursday. These are journeys we have taken before I started the blog, but are well worth sharing. Many of these Throwback Adventures will include our Buster, who was known for his crazy tail, his happy howl, and his zest for life. We miss him dearly…he is forever in our hearts!

In October 2017 Shadow, Wilma, My Mom, and I Adventured to the Mt. Orne Covered Bridge in Lancaster, New Hampshire.  The Mt. Orne Covered Bridge is listed as located in Lancaster, New Hampshire, but connects Lancaster with Lunenburg, Vermont.  It was built in 1911 and crosses the Connecticut River.

We had a wonderful Adventure to the Mt. Orne Covered Bridge.  This was one of our Adventures on a Fall weekend getaway, the first Fall getaway for Wilma, yet what has become an annual tradition.  We ventured far North to discover this lovely Bridge, making sure to photograph the Bridge from various angles.  It was extremely long, and beautifully landscaped with natural features.  We sauntered around the field-like area surrounding the Bridge.  The Mt. Orne Bridge was definitely one of the more rural covered bridges we have discovered, away from the bustles of the word.  So glad we could take the trip to visit the Mt. Orne Covered Bridge (Throwback Adventures will not always be rated)

 

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Throwback Adventure – Andres Institute of Art – New Hampshire

I will have sections of my blog that I will title “Throwback Adventure”, and will plan on posting them every Thursday. These are journeys we have taken before I started the blog, but are well worth sharing. Many of these Throwback Adventures will include our Buster, who was known for his crazy tail, his happy howl, and his zest for life. We miss him dearly…he is forever in our hearts!

In June 2015 Shadow, Buster, and I Adventured to the Andres Institute of Art in Brookline, New Hampshire.  The Andres Institute of Art is reported to be New England’s largest sculpture park.  It was founded in 1996 by supporter Paul Andres and sculptor John Weidman.  The Park is a public park and is free of charge, although donations are appreciated.

We had a unique Adventure to the Andres Institute of Art, one of our first sculpture park adventures.  We enjoyed hiking in the woods, the terrain a little overgrown, and uneven.  I remember finding some sculptures, but also thinking there were few available for viewing.  However, in reading more about it to create this blog I would guess if I had located a map beforehand my thoughts may have been different.  However, we enjoyed a warm walk, searching for the sculptures between the trees, and photographing those we located.  I should have been more prepared, but still glad we could visit this distinctive New England Park (Throwback blogs will not always be rated).

 

January 5, 2019 – Northern Rail Trail – New Hampshire

Today Shadow, Wilma, and I Adventured to the Northern Rail Trail in Lebanon, New Hampshire.  The Northern Rail Trail is a 58 mile multi-use trail popular for dog walking, running, skiing, biking, and snowmobiling.  It runs from Lebanon to Boscawen and is the longest Rail Trail in New Hampshire

We had a simple Adventure to the Northern Rail Trail.  I planned this stop to break up our trip which involved various Adventures throughout Vermont.  I was quite curious to explore this Trail as I had read that it often parallels the river and has bridges along the route.  There was a brief jaunt where we were able to see the River, which I believe was the Connecticut River.  We were able too locate a little trail that went directly to the River’s edge although too far above the River for Shadow and Wilma to drink or swim.  (The video below is from the River as we walked back to the Trail).

Throughout our walk I was glad to see that the trail was not just behind backyards, but also traversed the woods, paralleled the river, and went through field-type landscape.  I was disappointed to only spot one bridge, concrete, and dull, but yet had realized we might not see any bridges due to the sheer length of the Trail.

Along our walk we saw many dog walkers, and were quite glad to not run into any snowmobiles.  So overall I would say this was typical to my other visits to Rail Trails, a simple, and long walk with no memorable landmarks.  However, likely a much different experience for those on a bicycle.  Nevertheless still glad we could walk on the Northern Rail Trail today (Rating:  3).